Tuft And Needle vs Casper: Mattress Comparison Review 2020

Tuft and Needle vs Casper

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One of the many conveniences in our modern world is the ability to buy just about anything online, even mattresses. The tricky part is picking which mattress. With so many options, and unfortunately no way to test before buying, having an in-depth review is going to be essential. For the purpose of this review, we’ve narrowed it down to Tuft and Needle vs Casper.

They’re both strong contenders, but there are still some key differences between them that you should be aware of. So without further ado, here’s our Tuft and Needle vs Casper essential review.

Tuft And Needle Logo

Tuft & Needle

4.7(3000 reviews)
  • Affordable
  • Great for combo sleepers
  • Firmer support
  • All sizes available
  • 10-year warranty
  • Two-layer framework
Read more
Casper logo

Casper

4.8(3109 reviews)
  • A bit pricier
  • Great for side sleepers
  • Medium firmness
  • All sizes available
  • 10-year warranty
  • Three-zone framework
Read more
Check Price Here

LABOR DAY SALE 10% off everything.*

Tuft And Needle vs Casper: Construction

The starting point when considering which mattress to buy is construction. It’s what determines how comfortable, durable, and versatile your mattress will be. So, to compare Tuft and Needle to Casper, we need to start by comparing their construction.

Both lines include all-foam construction mattresses, as well as hybrid construction mattresses, which include both foam and springs in their construction.

Tuft And Needle

tuff and needle mattress construction

Starting with Tuft and Needle, we’re going to take a comprehensive look at the construction of each mattress, including the cover, comfort layer, transition layer, and foundation layer for Tuft and Needle’s three mattress lines.

Cover

The cover of the tuft and Needle mattress is made of a thin blended layer of polyester and micro-polyamide. It’s a thin and exceptionally breathable material.

Comfort Layer

The comfort layer of all Tuft and Needle mattresses is three inches of their proprietary adaptive foam. This foam is meant to strike a balance between the features usually offered by memory foam and latex. Consequently, it offers mild conforming, and high adaptiveness, so it is supportive but also easy to move on top of.

The adaptive foam layer is also graphite and gel-infused for additional temperature regulation. It prevents heat build-up and retains its firmness even with increased temperature.

Transition Layer

Not all of Tuft and Needles mattresses have a transition layer. Their original mattress cuts right from the comfort layer to the foundation layer, meaning that heavier users and other folks who need more support may want to go for a different option.

Their Mint offering includes a second layer of the adaptive foam, making it a better option for heavier users.

The hybrid has micro-coils and uses a slightly different formulation of their adaptive foam for the transition layer. This, and other factors, make it the softest and bounciest of Tuft and Needle’s offerings.

Foundation Layer

Both the Original and the Mint tuft and needle mattress use 7 inches of high-density polyfoam for their base layer. It provides a firm, even base for the mattress, and overall helps it hold the shape well. The addition of a transition layer for the Tuft and Needle Mint vs Original will prevent uncomfortable contact with this base layer.

The hybrid replaces the polyfoam layer with pocketed innerspring coils. For customers looking for more bounce, or greater ventilation and circulation, the hybrid is the better option because of this foundation layer.

Casper

casper mattress contrustion

There are a few key differences in construction when you compare Casper vs Tuft and Needle that result in significantly different experiences. Casper also has 5 different models, all of which have some variation in construction at the comfort layer and below. They are the Original, Hybrid, Element, Nova Hybrid, and Wave Hybrid.

Cover

The cover for all of Casper’s mattresses is a recycled polyester blend. It’s a little less breathable than Tuft and Needle, but it is removable. That means you have extra options for cleaning and can even swap out the cover if it’s been damaged.

Comfort Layer

The Original and Hybrid Casper mattresses both offer 1.5 inches of a vented polyfoam material that Casper describes as using patented Airscape technology. This adds extra breathability and circulation to even their basic offerings.

The Casper Element has three inches of the same Airscape polyfoam (but no transition layer, which we’ll cover shortly)

Both the Wave Hybrid and Nova Hybrid have just 1 inch of polyfoam, but more comprehensive options in the transition layer (again, more on that shortly). The polyfoam on the Nova Hybrid uses a more adaptive construction than the Wave hybrid, so you’ll notice a difference in terms of how easy it is to move and reposition between them.

Transition Layer

Once again, we see the same construction between the Original and Hybrid Casper mattresses. They both use a 2 inch zoned polyfoam layer for the construction. The zoned construction provides extra support through key areas, most notably lumbar support for back sleepers.

As mentioned previously, the Element mattress has no transition layer, which makes it less supportive for heavier sleepers, and those that favor certain positions.

The Wave Hybrid has the most complex and unique core structure of any mattress you’ll come across when you compare Tuft and Needle to Casper. It has 1.5 inches each of ventilated latex, zoned memory foam, and zoned polyfoam with built-in targeted gel pods. The gel pods provide a similar benefit to the zoned polyfoam but allow even more targeted transitions between softness and support. The layers above it cancel any excessive motion that may be translated by the gel pods.

The Nova Hybrid has a transition layer that consists of 1.5 inches of zoned polyfoam, followed by 2 inches of contour-cut memory foam. The combination of the zoned and contoured polyfoam enhances the cradling sensation you typically get from a memory foam mattress.

Foundation Layer

All Casper mattresses except the Element have a base layer consisting of 7 inches of an extra-supportive polyfoam.

The Element, by contrast, only uses 6.5 inches of foam for its foundation layer. Not typically enough difference to result in any noticeable change in comfort or performance, but it makes some difference in terms of placement and measurement.

The hybrid models (Hybrid, Nova Hybrid, and Wave hybrid) have pocketed springs set in this base layer, which provide extra springiness and ventilation which can be offset or enhanced by the varied construction through the transition layers.

Tuft And Needle vs Casper: The Feel

Tuft And Needle Logo

Tuft & Needle

4.7(3000 reviews)
  • Affordable
  • Great for combo sleepers
  • Firmer support
  • All sizes available
  • 10-year warranty
  • Two-layer framework
Read more
Casper logo

Casper

4.8(3109 reviews)
  • A bit pricier
  • Great for side sleepers
  • Medium firmness
  • All sizes available
  • 10-year warranty
  • Three-zone framework
Read more
Check Price Here

LABOR DAY SALE 10% off everything.*

Where construction can start to give you an idea of how a mattress is going to perform, there are a few specific considerations when you look at a Tuft and Needle mattress vs a Casper mattress that need to be addressed. 

For the purpose of being able to make a one to one comparison on these questions, we’re going to look at the three Tuft and Needle models (Original, Mint, and Hybrid) and weigh them against their nearest equivalents from Casper (Element, Original, and Hybrid). There will be a quick recap on the higher end Casper offerings towards the end.

Tuft And Needle

tuft and needle

Overall, the main difference you’ll note Tuft & Needle vs Casper is that Tuft and Needle mattresses are going to provide a more uniform feel than the Casper mattresses, but because of that might not be as supportive in a couple of key positions. They’re also a bit firmer overall.

The comfort layers of the Tuft and Needle mattresses are a highly responsive polyfoam, so restless sleepers (or partners of restless sleepers) are going to be happy with their offerings.

Back Sleeper

Back Sleepers, especially people of above-average weight (upwards of 225), are going to find the Original a little lacking in support overall. The mint and especially the hybrid are going to be better, but still lacking extra support through key weight distribution areas.

Side Sleeper

Side Sleepers are going to find their weight more evenly distributed across multiple pressure points, so are going to have better luck with all three of Tuft and Needle’s offerings. Heavier customers might still have some issue with the Original and it’s lack of a transition layer.

Stomach Sleeper

Stomach sleepers are, for the most part, going to face the same challenges as back sleepers. The Original is not going to be an optimal choice for stomach sleepers, while the Mint and Hybrid will address this adequately for customers who weigh less than 200 pounds. Heavier customers will probably be better served with zoned support.

Casper

casper

On the whole, Casper is a slightly softer mattress not necessarily a massive difference, but certainly, enough to notice. Because of the zoned foam construction in the transition layers of most of their options, how supportive it is will vary heavily depending on your sleeping position.

The comfort layer is also a polyfoam, and still fairly reactive, so in terms of movement and reposition Tuft & Needle vs Casper are going to be fairly comparable options. Casper has more hybrid options, meaning more bounce, and more movement being translated across the bed, so as a composite average they’re not the best, but still have a couple of solid options in that category.

Back Sleeper

With its lack of a transition layer, and therefore lack of zoned polyfoam supports, the Element isn’t going to be a great option for back sleepers, especially not heavier customers.

The Original and Hybrid both have the same layer of the zoned polyfoam, and so are both going to be excellent options for back sleepers. Deciding between the two should mostly come down to a difference of preference in breathability and bounce.

Side Sleeper

Side sleepers aren’t going to see as much of an advantage from the zoned support offered by the Original and Hybrid options, and so might not need to upgrade past the Element. The extra transition layer is still going be a bonus for heavier sleepers regardless of their sleeping position.

Stomach Sleeper

Once again, because of the lack of transition layer and zoned support, the Element is going to be ruled out for most stomach sleepers.

The zoned support offered by both the Hybrid and Original makes them excellent choices for stomach sleepers.

Tuft And Needle vs Casper: Sinkage & Bounce

How much you sink into both the center and side of the mattress, as well as how much it bounces are going to be deciding factors as well.

You might not spend a lot of time sitting on the edge of your bed, but your experience when you do is going to make a difference in your overall impression of the bed.

Tuft And Needle

Tuft and Needle use more foam in its top layer, so sitting on the edge is going to be less stable. 

Because it uses more foam, there’s more sinkage overall, which if you’re a sound sleeper is going to create a deeper cradle. On the other hand, if you’re a restless sleeper it can be a less positive experience, though this is mostly offset by the responsiveness of their foam.

Tuft and Needle has an excellent bounce for a full foam mattress, doubly true for their hybrid option. Overall it’s going to be a slightly better experience for restless sleepers.

Casper

Casper has a firmer edge rest, which is slightly ironic given that it’s overall the softer mattress. There’s less foam on the comfort layer, so you don’t get as much sinkage. It’s slightly less responsive, so you get a good balance for both restful and restless sleepers. Their non-hybrid options aren’t quite as bouncy as tuft and needles, but still entirely adequate. Their many hybrid options have excellent bounce, while still offering good sinkage.

Tuft And Needle Vs Casper: Other model

Product
Features
Tuft & Needle

Tuft & Needle

Casper Wave Hybrid

Casper Wave Hybrid

Casper Nova Hybrid

Casper Nova Hybrid

As mentioned, we’re going to do a quick recap on the capabilities of the Wave and Nova hybrid models from Casper.

Side sleepers are going to get a better experience from the Nova hybrid because of its contouring. Back and stomach sleepers are going to enjoy the zoning and targeted gel support offered by the Wave Hybrid.

The Nova has better sinkage, where the Wave has more bounce.

The Nova has somewhat better circulation, but they’re mostly equivalent.

Purchasing Information

Both mattresses can be purchased on their respective websites. Tuft and Needle is available at www.tuftandneedle.com. While Casper is available at www.Casper.com

Both offer trial periods, warranties, and various options for shipping, which we’ll cover in more depth here.

The trial period is especially worth noting because it allows you to get a good feel for the mattress, and return it for a full refund if it’s not adequate. The main hangup people have about buying a mattress online is the lack of ability to get a feel for it, so the trial and return is a very helpful feature of both companies purchasing features.

Trial Period

Tuft and Needle offers a 100 night trial, with free returns for a full, no questions asked refund if the mattress is returned within that time period. There’s no minimum trial period either; you can return it after just one night (or less time, if there are other problems with it.)

Casper’s trial and return policy is largely identical. A 100 night trial period, with no minimums, restocking fees, or penalties for returns.

Both companies offer coordinated pickup for returns, in case you were worried about having to haul a mattress to the post office.

Warranty

Both companies offer a 10 year warranty on their products. Of the two, Tuft and Needle has the better warranty because it is non-prorated. That means that if a defect occurs at any point during that 10 years, the full price of the mattress is refunded, regardless of how much time has passed.

Casper’s warranty is a 10 year limited warranty, which means it reserves the right to prorate the refund against defects that may have occurred later in the mattress’s lifetime.

Shipping

Both companies offer bed in a box and white glove shipping, with both companies offering their bed in a box shipping for free. Bed in a box shipping simply means the bed comes in a vacuum-sealed bag inside a box delivered by a standard shipping courier. Some extra set-up is required with bed in a box shipping and the mattress might need time to re-inflate to its full size.

White glove shipping, by comparison, includes both delivery and installation from a specialized team. Casper offers free white glove shipping on the king and California king models of the Wave Hybrid mattress, and white glove shipping for an added fee on all other sizes and models of their mattresses.

Tuft and Needle offers white glove shipping for an added fee on all sizes and models.

Tuft And Needle vs Casper: Price & Sizing

Below is the sizing and pricing options for the mattresses offered by Tuft and Needle Mattress vs Casper.

Tuft and Needle

Original Mattress Mint Mattress Hybrid Mattress
Twin - $350
$595
$895
Twin XL - $395
$645
$995
Full - $495
$845
$1295
Queen - $595
$995
$1495
King - $750
$1145
$1745
California King - $750
$1145
$1745

Casper

Element Mattress Original Mattress Hybrid Mattress Wave Hybrid Mattress Nova Hybrid Mattress
Twin - $395
$595
$695
$1495
$1095
Twin XL - $445
$695
$795
$1695
$1245
Full - $545
$995
$1195
$1695
$1795
Queen - $595
$1095
$1295
$1595
$1995
King - $795
$1295
$1495
$2995
$2295
California King - $795
$1295
$1495
$2995
$2295

Tuft And Needle vs Casper: Which One To Buy?

Which mattress you buy is going to largely be a matter of personal preference and sleeping style. Both have specific advantages that vary even more substantially based on the specific model and construction

If you prefer a firmer mattress or sleep on your side a Tuft and Needle is going to be an excellent option. It’s also a great option for lighter customers, and especially people looking to buy a mattress for a child.

On the other hand, if you like a slightly softer mattress or sleep primarily on your stomach or back, Casper is going to be the better option. Casper is overall the better option for support, especially for heavier customers. They also have a wider range of hybrid (spring & foam) mattresses if that’s your preference.

FAQ

You may have some further specific questions. We’ve attempted to address the common ones here.

Which mattress sleeps cooler?

Both Tuft and Needle and Casper mattresses are primarily made of memory foam. That means that neither is particularly great in terms of coolness or heat regulation. Both have measures in place to address overheating.

Tuft and Needle uses a hybrid polyfoam with gel and graphite construction. This distributes heat better across the mattress, and if you sleep in hot weather, but don’t generate a ton of heat yourself, this will be the better option.

Tuft and Needle’s cover is also a more breathable blend of material.

Casper uses special ventilation that they call Airscape technology, which means that their mattresses have extra ventilation built into the comfort layers that you don’t usually get with memory foam mattresses. If you generate more heat personally this will probably be the better option.

In both cases, their hybrid mattresses are going to provide better circulation because of the air pockets around the springs.

Which mattress is more affordable?

To a certain extent, this is going to depend on the model you get.

Tuft and Needle’s mattresses start at a lower price point and scale up to more slowly, so they’re generally the more affordable option.

Casper, on the other hand, offers a $100 discount for first-time buyers. That’s going to make their lower-priced options cheaper than Tuft and Needle but isn’t going to make a difference for their top of the line models, especially premium options like the Wave and Nova Hybrids.

For the most part, Tuft and Needle are more affordable, and their warranty isn’t prorated, making them a better pricing option for budget-conscious shoppers.

On the other hand, if you have specific needs that only the Casper addresses, you’re going to get more value for your money. They’re very close in price, so you should make your decision on needs and preferences and not the price point alone.

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